Mary Flanagan

Professor Flanagan named one of 30 inaugural fellows

Professor Mary Flanagan has been named one of 30 inaugural fellows of the Higher Education Video Game Alliance.  The HEVGA fellows program recognizes senior scholars in the games field who have made significant contributions in design, theory, or research.  Read more about Professor Flanagan and this honor in Dartmouth News 

Tiltfactor to hold Open House

Dartmouth's game design and research lab invites the community to visit their space and play games created at Tiltfactor: web games, card games- even room escape games!  Tiltfactor will also debut their two new crowdsourcing projects: Crowded Dungeon and r-kive.  

The event will be from 4:30 to 6:30 PM on Wednesday, November 9th in Room 246, Black Family Visual Arts Center.

Email or call with any questions about the event: contact@tiltfactor.org / 603-646-1007

Tiltfactor Lab research publication trumpeted in press

"A psychologically “embedded” approach to designing games for prosocial causes", by Professors Mary Flanagan and Geoff Kaufman and published in Cyberpsychology, the Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, was covered by Fast Company, Huffington Post and Vocativ. The articles explore the games Awkward Moment and Buffalo: The Name-Dropping Game, created in Professor Flanagan's Tiltfactor Lab, that deal with gender and racial stereotypes.

Tiltfactor Labs "RePlay Health" game explores public health preconceptions

"The role-playing game RePlay Health uses physical challenges to get players to think about how environmental and economic factors, among others, can affect individual health." Read (and hear) more at NHPR

Professor Flanagan's new game challenges traditional stereotypes

"Monarch", a new board game developed by Professor Mary Flanagan and the Tiltfactor research lab, features sisters maneuvering to become queen.  Read more about this exciting new game (and the Kickstarter campaign still in progress) in this Dartmouth Now article

Game Changer

An excerpt from an article in the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine about professor Mary Flanagan, printed in the Nov-Dec 2014 issue:

"First, let’s get something out of the way. Mary Flanagan, Dartmouth’s digital humanities chair and founder of the game design and research lab Tiltfactor, could expound for hours on the history of games and the psychology and design of them, whether it’s Tic-Tac-Toe or Angry Birds, but she is not interested in yet another conversation about violence in video games. 'It’s the first question the media has asked me in my entire career,' she says. 'And I think it’s a little weird.' (For the record, this reporter waited until at least 40 minutes into the interview.) 'I suppose that if games can be used as a tool for good, one could argue that they could also be a tool for the not-so-good,' she adds. 'But I’ll leave that for other folks to spend time on.'"

Read more from the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine here.

The Classroom as Arcade

An excerpt from an opinion piece published by Inside Higher Ed written by professor Mary Flanagan:

"'Clearly, the lure of the laptop is too compelling to resist,' writes Dartmouth’s Mary Flanagan in an Inside Higher Ed opinion piece.

Some students habitually engage with their Facebook pages or play video games during class, to their own detriment and to the detriment of their classmates, writes Flanagan, a professor of film and media studies and the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities.

'Multitasking makes us poor learners, studies show,' Flanagan writes. 'It not only hurts the perpetrator by splitting their focus and attention, but it hurts those sitting around the multitasker and lowers everyone’s overall performance on each task. While millennials may think they have better multitasking chops than older generations, data show this assumption to be false.'"

Read the full opinion piece, published 6/6/14 by Inside Higher Ed.

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